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whichwaysup

Best way to keep spare hubs ready

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I'm going to be replacing my hubs today proactively, though both seem to be in pretty decent shape.   Beyond just peace of mind (first time I've replaced since owning the trailer), one of the other draws was having the old hubs as spares in case of emergency.    

Question - for others who have done/do this, how do you store the spare hubs?  Do you clean out the old grease and keep them ungreased, or do you store them greased and ready to go.  if so, are there any caps available to keep that grease from leaking out?

Sorry if a rube kind of question, but at midnight, on a dark road, on a narrow shoulder, in an emergency, I really want to spend as little time as possible changing out a hub on my trailer!

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If you are concerned about having trailer hub issues, I would tend to keep spare bearings instead of hubs.  If you ruin your hubs while driving its because your bearings were in bad shape to begin with. Its a lot easier and faster to change out the bearing.

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Ditch the current hubs. Buy 4 new lubed & assembled hubs....2 for the trailer and 2 for spares. They're cheap. 

Do not ask me why I would never again keep an old hub or bearings for a spare! That was a memorable summer eve on the side of the road in the Everglades.... 🤬

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I always keep a spare hub near by....two if on the road for any period of time.  I have a few rebuilt hubs that I keep as spares. I keep them in a large zip lock bag in the shop. When I trailer, I throw one or both in the truck depending on how far I'm going. If you have a torsion axle, it's pretty quick and easy to keep a spindle and hub ready to go. Knock out a cotter pin, remove castle nut and washer, tap out. Install new set up in reverse. The dust cap on the flange side keeps the flange side tidy and the bearing seal on the other side should already be neat and clean.

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3 hours ago, BradM said:

I always keep a spare hub near by....two if on the road for any period of time.  I have a few rebuilt hubs that I keep as spares. I keep them in a large zip lock bag in the shop. When I trailer, I throw one or both in the truck depending on how far I'm going. If you have a torsion axle, it's pretty quick and easy to keep a spindle and hub ready to go. Knock out a cotter pin, remove castle nut and washer, tap out. Install new set up in reverse. The dust cap on the flange side keeps the flange side tidy and the bearing seal on the other side should already be neat and clean.

Like Conocean and Brad mentioned.  You want NEW hubs, greased and ready to slide on.  You do not want to be changing bearings and greasing a 200 degree hub on the side of the road. 

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16 hours ago, DonV said:

Another option, if you have the room,  is to get a spare tire holder that also holds a spare hub.

https://www.sturdybuiltonline.com/Trailer-Spare-Tire-and-Hub-Carrier-5-Lug-for-3500lb-Axles_p_232.html

 

Hmm, I like this a lot.  wonder if they have a galvanized hub vs painted, or just the bracket.  will do a little morr research.

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Instead of replacing hubs, I suggest replacing the bearings and seals in your existing hubs.  Most new hubs come with Chinese bearings and seals.

Chinese bearings are made from inferior steel and sloppy manufacturing tolerances.  

Find a local industrial bearing distributor and buy quality bearings and seals.

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The previous owner of my Redfisher hung two tires with hubs and bearings installed on the trailer. I would rotate them every six months or before long trips. Everything stayed nicely lubed and ready to go.

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2 hours ago, Bamaskeet said:

Instead of replacing hubs, I suggest replacing the bearings and seals in your existing hubs.  Most new hubs come with Chinese bearings and seals.

Chinese bearings are made from inferior steel and sloppy manufacturing tolerances.  

Find a local industrial bearing distributor and buy quality bearings and seals.

This is absolutely true too, and worth the mention. I ALWAYS upgrade to Timken bearings and races. If packing your own, use good grease as well. I prefer Lucas, Red and Tacky, you may like something else. If you remove your hubs, the bearing and race number should be on them. If not, take them to an industrial bearing distributor and they can match them up. Napa might be able to help too, but last time I was there they offered up a Chinese "kit" and that's not what I was after. Check out Applied Industrial Technologies or Motion Industries, they will absolutely have what you need. I work with both companies daily and can help you out if you need me to.

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I also keep a spare hub in the original plastic box, plus extra bearings, races, seals and a seal/race driving kit. 

For those that keep an extra hub on their spare tire, how do you keep the water, sand and other debris out of the hub while it is sitting in the open?

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4 hours ago, SCFD rtrd. said:

I also keep a spare hub in the original plastic box, plus extra bearings, races, seals and a seal/race driving kit. 

For those that keep an extra hub on their spare tire, how do you keep the water, sand and other debris out of the hub while it is sitting in the open?

I believe the spare carrier has a spindle mount on it, so it would the same as being installed on the trailer, but not gaining the mileage. :D

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18 hours ago, BradM said:

I believe the spare carrier has a spindle mount on it, so it would the same as being installed on the trailer, but not gaining the mileage. :D

You are correct Sir! The only addition would be a "anti-theft" chain/cable to 1. obviously deter theft and 2. keep the wheel from spinning while going down the road. You can also tighten the axle nut real tight to keep it from spinning. I've actually had to replace a hub once and just took the spare tire off with hub still attached and slid the whole thing in place. 

23 hours ago, SCFD rtrd. said:

I also keep a spare hub in the original plastic box, plus extra bearings, races, seals and a seal/race driving kit. 

For those that keep an extra hub on their spare tire, how do you keep the water, sand and other debris out of the hub while it is sitting in the open?

It's a sealed hub, rear seal and outside cap in place will last for many, many years.

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On 2/8/2019 at 7:51 AM, whichwaysup said:

Hmm, I like this a lot.  wonder if they have a galvanized hub vs painted, or just the bracket.  will do a little morr research.

This, or some version of this, is the way to go IMO. When you get a flat or bearing failure you only need to remove the dust cap and the axle nut and change out the whole assembly instead of dicking with lug nuts at night, during the August Jurassic horse fly hatch, in the rain, on Ingraham Hwy, etc...

Channel locks and a flat head screwdriver and your good (I keep a cotter pin duct taped to the channel lock pliers)

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