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Replacement Trailer Tires

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So I have to replace my original tires on my magictrail for my 2000 22v. I have the 13" 185 sized tires, but was looking to jump to the 14" 200/85. Questions are, do I really need a D rated tire and what are the opinions on radial versus bias ply? I don't trailer often, but I do go through spurts where we trailer more one year versus the next. Also, what type of tires come on the newer trailers out of curiosity. Thanks!

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You don't see race cars using street tires. All tires are designed for a purpose and trailer tires have specific designs for the sidewalls and stresses that they undergo while turning and bouncing down the road. I would always go with a D rated tire for the extra durability.

For a 14 kumho seems to be the most talked about for a 13 kumho does not make one. I have 13 D on my 22te but will have to look later for the manufacture.

Rather then plug a flat try putting a tube in it.

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Good point. I hadn't thought of that.

Plus my boat is in the lighter side, so not sure if the "wiggle" I hear about with radial will be that big of a deal. But, they are pricier.

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Another vote for trailer tires and the highest rating possible. If your running 13s under a 22' Pathy I guess its tandem axle and okay on weight but I would feel much more comfortable with the 14s if it was me. Definitely radials as well. Trailer and tows much better in my opinion. Tires are the absolute one place I don't skimp even if only taking one trip a year. I prefer that one trip to not be eventful... in the trailering kind of way.

Good rubber is expensive...but so was my boat.

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I believe 13" trailer tires are rated for 1350 pounds each and 14" are rated for 1750 pounds each. So, just upgrading to 14" tires will give you 800 pounds more carrying capacity. That's good news right there. I've never had a D-rated to on my trailers, just C-rated. What ever you do, get them balanced.

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That was my initial thought on th switch to 14". I'd get the extra capacity. I'll look at the radials. I think I should be able to fit th 14" with th 205/75. Now, it looks like they should fit, but hate to buy 4 tires and have it not fit.

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That was my initial thought on th switch to 14". I'd get the extra capacity. I'll look at the radials. I think I should be able to fit th 14" with th 205/75. Now, it looks like they should fit, but hate to buy 4 tires and have it not fit.

Need to be sure fenders have sufficient clearance with larger tires....you need at least 2" for bouncing...

dc

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Well I've said this before, but here goes. I don't see why use a light truck tire on a trailer would be a bad thing. They are built to a much higher standard and hold much more weight than trailer tires.Have you ever watched the front tires on your truck when making a sharp turn on asphalt or concrete. The tires look like they are about to roll off the rim. My truck weighs 7200# and the front tires handle that Ok. So, why wouldn't they work just fine on a boat trailer???

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Let me strongly second that idea that you NEVER skimp on trailer ties. There is nothing sadder than a boat trailer stuck on the side of the highway on a Sunday night in the middle of nowhere.

I was very surprised that my 2010 Ameritrail, which in my opinion is the best trailer ever made, came with very poor tires. I had one delaminate on me going down the highway. Lucky I caught it right away and caused no damage to the trailer or the boat. I forget the brand. I did post a warning about that brand here so no one else would get hurt. I replaced the tires with a better brand (forget the name but was told they are the best). Unfortunately, they also started to come apart. My trailer shop spotted the delamination while servicing the rig. Tread was new, plys were coming apart!?. The trailer guys sent me to a nearby commercial trailer place. They handled all the landscaping, home repair, etc. trailers. They suggested 6 ply, that's right, 6 ply Triangle brand tires. They are steel belted radials of course. Balanced them and added metal valve stems and thousands of miles latter, no problems at all. I highly recommend them.

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SCFD rtrd. said:
Well I've said this before, but here goes. I don't see why use a light truck tire on a trailer would be a bad thing. They are built to a much higher standard and hold much more weight than trailer tires.Have you ever watched the front tires on your truck when making a sharp turn on asphalt or concrete. The tires look like they are about to roll off the rim. My truck weighs 7200# and the front tires handle that Ok. So, why wouldn't they work just fine on a boat trailer???

Interesting point.

While I wouldn't trust regular car tires...LT tires will do the job. Many many travel trailers come with them OEM. Especially the heavy fifth wheels in the 9-10K up range.

Goodyear for instance makes an LT they sell and recommend for trailers. Their G614RST in LT235/85R16 is specifically designed for "5th Wheel and Heavy trailer applications"

*Page 16 at http://www.goodyearrvtires.com/pdfs/tire-care-guide.pdf

Most think of marathons when they think of Goodyear but they have others as do other companies. Personally I am not a fan of the marathons and have never run their other LTs.

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Trailer tires have a very different sidewall construction than truck tires for a reason.

Insurance companies are also aware of the difference in some cases.

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Ok. So there seems to be pros and cons for both. To be clear, I'm not a heavy towing person and I don't put a ton of miles. In fact, these are the original tires on the on his trailer from 2000. Trick has been to make sure they are fully inflated or slightly above. It does sit for longer periods during the winter. So, with that said, would a good bias ply tire be better for my application?

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Go to a travel trailer/rv dealer and get a good set of tires. Nothing wrong with radials since thats probably all they will carry.

But remember one thing. TIRE PRESSURE!! Keep the inflation at what is printed on the tire, after all, thats what the tire was engineered for.

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Keep fully inflated, low pressure is a tire killer. I have run LT tires on trailers without issues, ever. I have had supposedly very high end trailer tires in new condition blow out on the sidewall numerous times, both my last two year old Maxxis M8008's had belt separation, I don't buy the trailer tire hype.

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Replace the valve stems too.

The metal ones hold up well. The standard rubber ones don't last forever and the high pressure is close to there max useful limits. Get the ones for high pressure or metal ones.

A leaking valve stem will kill a tire, losing pressure as you ride.

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Replace the valve stems too.

The metal ones hold up well. The standard rubber ones don't last forever and the high pressure is close to there max useful limits. Get the ones for high pressure or metal ones.

A leaking valve stem will kill a tire, losing pressure as you ride.

Excellent point….metal valve stems :thumbup:

I bought three online and had them installed when I balanced my tires…

Bought Maxxis tires on line….brought the tires to my local firestone…they mounted and balanced for about $20 a tire if i can remember correctly.

I jacked up the trailer on stands and took over the spare, and two mains…dropped them off, went to the Dunk'n for a coffee and roll and by the time I came back…

done :)

dc

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Well now I'm totally confused. I have one of my 4 trailer tires sitting in the garage with what looks like a deck screw poking out of it (through the tread not the sidewall).

Took to a tire place and they refused to repair in any shape or fashion and told me you "can't" repair trailer tires because of the load...so am I to understand that every time I hit a nail I need to replace the tire??

That just seems ....ridiculous.

Looking for advice here...thanks.

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