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New Trailer Brakes

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Changed out brakes last weekend after seeing the original disc brake rotors rusting, spalling off metal, calipers frozen up, etc. I had used Kodiak stainless brakes on a previous boat's trailer and they held up great, so put four of the bad boys on the Ameratrail. Stainless slip on rotors, calipers, mounting brackets, and even the brake pads have stainless steel backing. Four new galvanized pre-greased hubs too.

The old brakes were the integral hub-rotor type which I don't care for.

I also found that the solenoid lock-out was no longer working, so I will replace that this weekend.

Ready for some spring fishing now, waters are warming.

[image]http://www.mbcforum.com/fbbuploads/1395410496-Kodiak_Trailer_Brakes_004.jpg[/image]

[image]http://www.mbcforum.com/fbbuploads/1395410483-Kodiak_Trailer_Brakes_002.jpg[/image]

1395410483-Kodiak_Trailer_Brakes_002.jpg

1395410496-Kodiak_Trailer_Brakes_004.jpg

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Looking good, will be goin the SS route myself on the next go round. What kind of life span over the standard brake setup do you expect?

Non-stainless set up lasts about 3-4 yrs. even with rinsing after each trip. I would expect the stainless to last at least double that especially with regular maintenance/ lube of the caliper slide bolts and piston.

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Maintenance is the key. All disk brakes function the same. Meaning there is a cylinder in the caliper and a S/S piston that travels about 1/8" to activate the brakes. If water enters the area between the piston and caliper, you're brakes are gonna lock-up.

My first pair of Kodiak brakes were cadmium and lasted 8 years. The second set lasted about 6 months because both the dust boots were compromised at the factory when they were manufactured.

S/S brakes definitely have fewer problems, but the weak link is the dust boot. Keep um clean.

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I have found that rinsing after launching the boat along with right after hauling the boat out, makes a huge difference in brake life. If there is not a wash down at the ramp, I carry a pump sprayer and rinse them. Its hard to take the time when all you want to do is fish, but a little time upfront saves a ton of time on the back end.

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Quick ???

Are you over 3 K total to be required to have brakes on both axles. :confused:

Never weighed the rig, but am pretty sure it's over the 3,000 lb. limit for Florida. Advertised weight with the VZ250 is 2,395 lbs. Adding the trailer, fuel and gear must bump it over.

I remember researching several years ago that Florida requires brakes on all axles if over 3,000 lbs.

Also heard that law enforcement does a lot of checking for this in the Keys, but I've never been checked.

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I weighed my 99 on a single axle trailer and it came in at 2700 and change.

I believe the hull 2010 was advertized at 1250 lbs, motor SHO 505lbs plus gear fuel and trailer weight. Yea I'm sure its close.

And yes, I got stopped in the keys and they burned me a new one pulling a Grady White with not having brakes on all axles. :(

Anyhow, the 2010 MA on the Ameritrail dual axle is brake free. At least it looks like you got some brakes to work with. Keep them clean is all I can say. My luck with brakes hasn't been so good.

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A caliper on one wheel went out on mine, I just removed the brakes from the rear axel and capped of the line. I notice no difference in stopping. I tow mine with a F250. I guess if one had a lighter truck then both axels might be needed.

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A caliper on one wheel went out on mine, I just removed the brakes from the rear axel and capped of the line. I notice no difference in stopping. I tow mine with a F250. I guess if one had a lighter truck then both axels might be needed.

Have you ever thought about rebuilding the caliper? The parts are available on-line. It's usually just two parts (0-ring and a dust boot). The piston can usually be cleaned up and reused. Parts are about $6.00 if you reuse the piston.

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Specifically, what is required for maintenance for the brakes? This is my first boat with brakes on the trailer. Is there a web page with this information? Thank you!

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Specifically, what is required for maintenance for the brakes? This is my first boat with brakes on the trailer. Is there a web page with this information? Thank you!

The best way to maintain brakes is to use a 1 gal. pump-up sprayer. Mix water and any brand of salt removing product like (Salt-Away or Salt-X). You have to spray the brakes when they are wet with salt water. Once the salt dries, these products will not remove the salt. One or two cups of solution per brake is more than enough to neutralize any salt water.

Rinse well with a garden hose when you get home or stop by a fresh water lake and dunk the trailer two or three times. In the last 30 years, I've owned two galvanized trailers (one with brakes) and when I sold the rigs they were still in great shape and all original parts.

When you do your annual bearing and seals maintains, pull the calipers off, grease the slide bolts and check the condition of the dust boot. The dust boot is a rubber seal that seals around the piston and caliper. It keeps salt water for entering that space, which will corrode any brand of brakes (stainless included)and cause the piston to lock-up.

Here is a pic of a typical caliper. The two 1/2" holes on the outsides is where the slide bolts go. They need cleaning and greasing

annually. The large hole in the center of the caliper is the cylinder. The S/S piston fits inside the cylinder and moves in and out about 1/8" when the brakes are applied. The duct boot (not pictured) looks like a rear seal for a hub and is pressed around the piston and in the cylinder. It keeps salt water from entering that space and causing corrosion.

DSC02864.jpg

The caliper in the pic is a Kodiak Cadmium plated. They lasted about 9 years on my old trailer. Maintenance is the key.

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I am getting ready to make the same conversion to Kodiak SS, but could use a little help. Which hubs did you use? I am being told that the Kodiak rotors will not work with all hubs, especially when used with aluminum wheels due to the studs not being long enough on some hubs.

Also, am I correct that since I have the super lube spindle, I do not need the super lube hub because the spindle works the same way when used on a regular hub?

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I am getting ready to make the same conversion to Kodiak SS, but could use a little help. Which hubs did you use? I am being told that the Kodiak rotors will not work with all hubs, especially when used with aluminum wheels due to the studs not being long enough on some hubs.

Never heard of that. I converted to Kodiak on my last trailer, but had galvanized rims. But, there was plenty of stud left over. The vender you buy from should be able to answer that.

Also, am I correct that since I have the super lube spindle, I do not need the super lube hub because the spindle works the same way when used on a regular hub?

Yes, the super lube spindle works the same way. It deposits grease to the rear of the hub, between the seal and the inside bearing.

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