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I was just wondering if some of you might be able to give me some insight on running pads on larger deep "v" hulls.  I understand the idea behind running pads on smaller performance boats, bass, flats, go fast river runner, ect, but when I see large deep "v" boats with a pad it leaves me scratching my head.  I can almost see it might be slightly helpful for a large boat to have a pad like the HPX where the "v" is flattened out. Maybe that type may reduce drag some but not sure how much or if any on a large boat.  I can see how the flattened "v" would give it a good place for transducers but other than that I am at  loss.  The pads that have me wondering more are the pads that come off the "v" to make the running surface like that of a lot of bass boats, Lake and Bays, ect.  I see these large 40'plus deep "v" boats and know they are not getting up and airing out on the pad.  Any insight would be helpful in my head scratching, thanks.

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No real clue, but Ill take a guess.  Any flat surface is going to help in lifting of the hull, which should reduce some of the wet running surface of the hull. Maybe its just to help with planing, but should help increase speed and efficiency also.  Now it will clearly never get up and run solely on the pad like a bass boat, but my guess is thats not the goal.

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Funny you brought this up as I was just thinking about this due to my new boat. I’ve had 2 Pathfinder’s with a “pad” so to speak and my Lappy Hewes and now Bulls Bay have the V that goes all the way to back (but otherwise very similar to Pathfinder). The Bulls Bay handles much more similar to the Hewes in that it wants to ride “though” chop where my Pathfinder’s rode better more on top of it. Neither is better or worse, just different... 

Also, not sure if it’s a design feature of a pad, or just a by product of it, but the boats with pads seem lil more stable. I almost never had to use my tabs on Pathfinder when load was unbalanced, but find myself doing more with new boat. -

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1 hour ago, justfish said:

Funny you brought this up as I was just thinking about this due to my new boat. I’ve had 2 Pathfinder’s with a “pad” so to speak and my Lappy Hewes and now Bulls Bay have the V that goes all the way to back (but otherwise very similar to Pathfinder). The Bulls Bay handles much more similar to the Hewes in that it wants to ride “though” chop where my Pathfinder’s rode better more on top of it. Neither is better or worse, just different... 

Also, not sure if it’s a design feature of a pad, or just a by product of it, but the boats with pads seem lil more stable. I almost never had to use my tabs on Pathfinder when load was unbalanced, but find myself doing more with new boat. -

Hmmmm.  I didn't know any Pathfinders had a pad. 

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Maybe I’m confused as to exactly what a “pad”. The V on my Hewes and new boat run all the way to transom as opposed to my Pathfinder’s bein like this

45A09876-FAF4-45A0-9A28-028D75D4DF03.jpeg

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1 hour ago, JEM said:

Hmmmm.  I didn't know any Pathfinders had a pad. 

Pathfinders do not.  The only MBC boats I have seen with a real pad is the lappy 19 Redfisher and a 21 MA

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18 minutes ago, justfish said:

Maybe I’m confused as to exactly what a “pad”. The V on my Hewes and new boat run all the way to transom as opposed to my Pathfinder’s bein like this

45A09876-FAF4-45A0-9A28-028D75D4DF03.jpeg

This is a "Pocket".  A pad is a flat or concaved running surface on the center of the keel.  My 21 has a pad and it stops right at the drain plug in front of the pocket.

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if i understand correctly, at transom the hull 'v' goes to a flat pad.  I think thats the design used in the 60's to increase lift and running speed.  My memory not as good as it should be, but think that was now famous design that won Fl to Bahamas race in like a 24ft deep v.. later used on (I think) SeeVee and various copies.  I'm sure somebody on here will elaborate.  

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3 hours ago, hurricane said:

No real clue, but Ill take a guess.  Any flat surface is going to help in lifting of the hull, which should reduce some of the wet running surface of the hull. Maybe its just to help with planing, but should help increase speed and efficiency also.  Now it will clearly never get up and run solely on the pad like a bass boat, but my guess is thats not the goal.

Hurricane, I think you DO have a clue and your explanation is spot-on!  Here's a snapshot showing the pad on the keel of a **brand bay boat.  This particular boat has a 19 degree deadrise, so it's not a super deep vee, but more vee than a flats or bass boat.  However, the pad allows it to jump up on plane with minimal bow rise, and it creates significant lift, for speed and efficiency.  The pad also helps prevent porpoising too, so less need for trim tabs to stabilize the ride.

padonkeel.png

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I can only speak for my 2007 2200V, but it doesn't have a pad.  It does have a pocket, but I am pretty sure that is not considered a pad.  A pad is a flat section on the keel at the stern.

Here is an image of a pad, and the pocket on my boat.

veepad-04b.jpg

untitled.png

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Thanks for the response guys. I see where it can help with planing and running now. My single track mind just always saw pads as aired out hulls. 

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3 hours ago, geeviam said:

Hurricane, I think you DO have a clue and your explanation is spot-on! 

Well dang,  I guess even a blind squirrel finds a nut once in awhile........

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If you guys no anyone with a Ranger / Gambler / STV / etc freshwater bass boat....look underneath it from the drain plug forward, you'll see a real pad. Those boats run on the pad at high speeds, there is literally very little if any boat hull in the water. If you are watching these boats run out across open water, you'll see about 90% of the boat completely out of the water. Neither my PF 24 or my PF 22 has a true running pad. 

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The HPX-V 18 has a flat pad on the keel - not sure about the HPX 17.  Dabear has the same motor on his HPX-V 18 as I have on my RF 16 (Yama VF115).  His boat runs near 4 MPH faster than mine at WOT, when he's running up on the pad.  Weight and hull design are factors as well.

Edited by geeviam
correction - mistaken mph, wrong boat

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2 hours ago, geeviam said:

The HPX-V 18 has a flat pad on the keel - not sure about the HPX 17.  Dabear has the same motor on his HPX-V 18 as I have on my RF 16 (Yama VF115).  His boat runs at least 6 MPH faster than mine at WOT, when he's running up on the pad.

His HPX is also not as wide and most likely lighter.

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1 hour ago, bernieNC said:

His HPX is also not as wide and most likely lighter.

They are different boats.  I know I'm not comparing apples to apples.  IMO, there's a fine line between just the right amount of vee for a soft ride, and enough lift for better speed, efficiency and stability.  The HPX 18 has it all.  The flat pad on the keel is just one part of the whole package, but it helps.

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