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FROZEN

Woodys Wax / Salt Away Flush Opinions?

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Guys,

At 1100 hrs, the F250 recently passed all tests with flying colors. Compression, exhaust leak down, etc were all performed. The only thing noticed by the service manager was that the thermostats were a “little crusty”. They were all replaced along with poppets and VST, among others.

So I’m looking for advice and opinions on a monthly treatment of Woodys Wax Flush, or similar. I initially picked the WW product because the fluid metering rig looked like it would last forever. I asked the service manager about a vinegar treatment, and he left me with the impression that it really wasn’t effective, but I could if it made me feel better. He was a little more positive when it came to WW, Salt away, etc. I asked him if he used it on his motor, also a 250 about the same vintage, and he said “no”.

I do fresh water flush after every use when motor is warm, at “tilt down” and “full tilt up” positions, per the book.

So opinions please!! Effective? Waste of time and money? Etc.?

Many thanks in advance!

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15 hours ago, FLDXT said:

I've never hear of doing an engine flush with Woody's wax or did I read this wrong?

WOODY WAX ENGINE FLUSH

FEATURING WOODY WAX ENGINE FLUSH INJECTOR KIT

Once a month treatment for outboards, inboards & jet skis

• Dissolves salt, scale & mineral deposits
• Lubricates water pumps & thermostats & internal cooling components
• Eliminates internal Engine corrosion

This proven corrosion blocking product will keep the inside of your engine free from corrosion and your cooling system working like new. 70% of all saltwater engine failures are directly related to salt water corrosion and cooling system problems. Treat your engine once a month to remove scale and salt and to keep the internal cooling parts lubricated and working properly. EASY TO USE !

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4 minutes ago, Bamaskeet said:

What's the matter with a crusty thermostat at 1100 hours?  

I guess I’m taking this “discovery” as an indicator of internal salt buildup. These thermostats have about 200 hours on them.

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On June 1, 2018 at 6:17 AM, FROZEN said:

I guess I’m taking this “discovery” as an indicator of internal salt buildup. These thermostats have about 200 hours on them.

Based on my experience, I don't think you need to change thermostats every 200 hours, Yamaha's maintenance schedule is a little over the top and keeps their dealers smiling.

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18 minutes ago, Bamaskeet said:

Based on my experience, I don't think you need to change thermostats every 200 hours, Yamaha's maintenance schedule is a little over the top and keeps their dealers smiling.

Bamaskeet, 

Agreed, however, I had a cooling problem. During runs above about 4500, temps would rise and eventually alarm with  “back to idle”.

After cooling at idle, I could run all day below 4500, but runs above would yield the same result.

I checked my invoice from the 1000 hr service, performed at 900 hours, and thermostats were replaced (or I paid to have them replaced!).

So, into the mechanic we go . His instructions were to fix the cooling problem and save me all the replaced parts. He replaced thermostats, poppets, and some other items, not related to cooling. The only cooling part looking different were all thermostats, which were crusty.

Cooling problem is now fixed and, so far, has not repeated. 

Sooooo.....either the Thermostats were NOT replaced at 900 hours, or do I need to step up my flushing methods??

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46 minutes ago, Bamaskeet said:

Based on my experience, I don't think you need to change thermostats every 200 hours, Yamaha's maintenance schedule is a little over the top and keeps their dealers smiling.

I hear you. The mechanic I just talked to tried to claim they should be changed every 100 service. You could hear the cash register as he spoke.

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The problem with using salt away and other products on a older engine is that it will break away build ups of crust that has accumulated over the years then those pieces migrate into the cooling jackets causing hot spots. 

If you start using salt away on a new motor that should not be a problem. 

I just flush mine with both the ear muffs and the hose attachment. I replaced the water pump yesterday, it looked brand new! Original and over 400 hours on it. A little bit of sand scuff but other than that nothing else. 

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Many thanks to all for your wisdom. I think the consensus is I just keep on with the normal flush. I’m probably overthinking this, and need to fish more. 

Thanks again!

M

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For those DIY ers'... You can drop your thermostat in a cup of microwaved vinegar for a while to clean the salt deposits off. Then put in a pot of water and heat on the stove top and make sure it opens before the water boils and re-install. There's no gaskets (on most models nowadays) to deal with. It literally cost nothing but 20 minutes of your time. I do this once a year when I take off the lower unit. I replaced my last thermostat at 400hrs out of guilt, it worked fine.

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Just to stir the pot a little...How many of you Yamaha guys use the built-in hose attachment to flush your engines? My owner's manual says to not run the engine while using this method. If I don't run the engine, the temps never get hot enough to open the thermostats, so I am essentially only flushing the lower part of the cooling system. Also, since the thermostats remain closed, they do not really get a decent flush either. At 450 hours, the thermostat on my F40 was pretty cruddy although the engine had been flushed after each use. I think the built-in flush on the Yamahas do not provide a sufficient flush of the cooling system. On the subject of Salt Away; I used it religiously on my inboard 5.7 Crusader and was happy with the results. One thing I did notice and was curious about was the fact that the Salt Away left a thin film on the surfaces of the cooling passages. It also left this thin film on the internal zincs, which makes me wonder if it was not defeating their purpose.

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I flush my F150 religiously and changed the thermostat at 2000 hours.  While it didn't look pristine, it wasn't ugly.

I changed my internal anodes at 1800 hours and they looked good, so I'm never going to change them again.

I changed the timing belt at 1500 hours, it looked great but my mechanic convinced me because  it was a 12 year old belt.

If your motor is running hot or has electrolysis issues than certainly you need to dig into the issue.

I think Yamaha's maintenance schedule is over the top and often a cash cow for their dealers.

 

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44 minutes ago, Wanaflatsfish said:

As my dealer mechanic says.....nothing better for a saltwater engine than a 1/2 hr run at WOT on a freshwater lake every month or so :)

 

dc

 

DC, et.al.

You bring up a good point on my original question I didn’t think about. I bought the boat used in NC where the vast majority of its 900 hrs of use was in fresh lake water. I’ve put about 200 hrs on it in two years in the Gulf. All salt. So, I have “crusty” thermostats after 200 hrs.

Is that normal? Does that change anyone’s opinion?  Should I go the next step and go for a treatment of some sort. Not much fresh water around here.

M

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2 hours ago, FROZEN said:

DC, et.al.

You bring up a good point on my original question I didn’t think about. I bought the boat used in NC where the vast majority of its 900 hrs of use was in fresh lake water. I’ve put about 200 hrs on it in two years in the Gulf. All salt. So, I have “crusty” thermostats after 200 hrs.

Is that normal? Does that change anyone’s opinion?  Should I go the next step and go for a treatment of some sort. Not much fresh water around here.

M

They are a very simple change to do yourself. If you are only worried about the thermostats it is probably cheaper to just change them yourself every couple/few hundred hours rather than buy the high dollar flush

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