Jump to content
HPX-VMiami

250 SHO reliability questions

Recommended Posts

wanted to hear some opinions from an owners perspective on the reliability of the 250sho motors. getting back in the market for a 22/ 23hps and almost every boat i am looking at has a 250sho. wanted to know common problems / things to look out for. always had yamaha's in the past but have no experience with the sho line of motors.  appreciate any input. thanks 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JEM has the 225 SHO....I'm sure he extensively researched everything possible before he purchased his....so reach out to him on this forum. I've owned the F250 and had over 1400 hours on it when I sold the boat and it still ran great. JJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

700 hours on my 250 SHO. Zero issues other than some corrosion on a few components around the steering tube and tilt tube.

 

It is very fast compared to my previous 250 HPDI VMAX in all respects on the same hull with the same prop. It out performs the same 2 stroke motor in all respects.

 

I have owned to date over 35 Yamaha engines since 1985. I have blown up one engine at 1000 hours on a 97 model Grady White. I had a pair of 130 HP first year 1985 model twins on a 240 Mako that rotted off the transom. Never ever failed.

 

Yes, Yamaha has had a few bumps on certain models over the years. I blew up 3 Mercury optimax engines in the early years of their design on my business partners boat.

 

That said i believe the SHO 4.2 is a solid design.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love mine, I bought it used and it’s a 2010 early model. Previous owner had a pile of hours before Yamaha replaced the powerhead and lower unit after some harmonic balancer issue. I’ve probably put 120 hours on mine since I’ve had it. It runs like you stole it. The issues I’ve had are corrosion on the steering tubes( got a buddy with a custom puller that pulls stainless rods out of the tilt tubes) and I had to replace a vst filter but we’ve fixed all of that pretty easily. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have put 130 hours on my 2017 225 SHO. The only issue has been one that is well known.... the so called “making oil” problem.  Over the last 30 or 40 hours, I have been running it “like I stole it.” and the making oil issue seems to be subsiding.  Hopefully, I have that solved.  But the torque and speed of these motors has to be felt to be  believed!  I love mine!  I went from an F150 to the SHO, and it made my 2007 2200V a completely different animal!!!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The SHO 250 my 24 Pathfinder had was manufactured in the Fall of 2010. It blew a gear case and Power head in under 600 hours. I'd get another one, but not the early models. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good question and research.

I have a 200, 2013 vintage. As described above I had the tilt tube corrode and replace last year and covered under warranty. That is a big ticket item if you have to pay for it. Also I had a sheared timing advance pin that allowed a valve to meet the piston. New powerhead at 15 hours. Built proof since then. Once it's out of warranty I am going to flash the ECM to 250. I would buy another.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 2014 250 SHO has 920 hours and the only problem was it took some doing to remove lower unit because previous owner neglected to properly lube shaft.  I’m trying to figure out which prop to run though. Currently have sws 15 x 19 P and turn 5900 rpm but can only get 51 mph top end ,jacked up and trimmed. Boat is a 22 te.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Waterman18 said:

My 2014 250 SHO has 920 hours and the only problem was it took some doing to remove lower unit because previous owner neglected to properly lube shaft.  I’m trying to figure out which prop to run though. Currently have sws 15 x 19 P and turn 5900 rpm but can only get 51 mph top end ,jacked up and trimmed. Boat is a 22 te.

Do you have a t-top?  I hit 56 mph at 6000 rpms today on an older 2007 2200V, with no top.  This is a 225 SHO turning a PT OFX3 x 19.”  I think a PT might do you some good!😃

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎4‎/‎21‎/‎2018 at 8:56 PM, JEM said:

I have put 130 hours on my 2017 225 SHO. The only issue has been one that is well known.... the so called “making oil” iproblem.  Over the last 30 or 40 hours, I have been running it “like I stole it.” and the making oil issue seems to be subsiding.  Hopefully, I have that solved.  But the torque and speed of these motors has to be felt to be  believed!  I love mine!  I went from an F150 to the SHO, and it made my 2007 2200V a completely different animal!!!!

I spoke about the "oil making" in depth with my local Yamaha mechanic, and his theory on it made plenty of sense to me, but I have not researched it to confirm or validate his opinion; perhaps the factory opinion or bulletin. The idea is that that while trolling or idling for long periods of time with the engine at a negative trim, it allows oil to pool on the lower two cylinders. This excess oil doesn't allow for a good seal for the rings in the cylinder, which allows fuel to get washed into the crank case/oil reservoir. The cylinders in the SHO (perhaps all Yamaha's now) are plasma infused aluminum; no more cast iron sleeves. As you can imagine, this provides a pretty slick cylinder wall, and coupled with excessive oil, you're asking for the very issue some of you are seeing.

The fix may not be running the dog mess out your engine though. As discussed with the mechanic, if you're going to be idling or trolling for prolonged periods of time, trim up some. Get the engine at least level or a slight positive trim on it. This will encourage the oil to go back into the crank case (sump tank) and allow the cylinders and rings to seal properly.

I only have 5.4 hours on my SHO, and initial thoughts are that it's a BEAST!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BradM said:

I spoke about the "oil making" in depth with my local Yamaha mechanic, and his theory on it made plenty of sense to me, but I have not researched it to confirm or validate his opinion; perhaps the factory opinion or bulletin. The idea is that that while trolling or idling for long periods of time with the engine at a negative trim, it allows oil to pool on the lower two cylinders. This excess oil doesn't allow for a good seal for the rings in the cylinder, which allows fuel to get washed into the crank case/oil reservoir. The cylinders in the SHO (perhaps all Yamaha's now) are plasma infused aluminum; no more cast iron sleeves. As you can imagine, this provides a pretty slick cylinder wall, and coupled with excessive oil, you're asking for the very issue some of you are seeing.

The fix may not be running the dog mess out your engine though. As discussed with the mechanic, if you're going to be idling or trolling for prolonged periods of time, trim up some. Get the engine at least level or a slight positive trim on it. This will encourage the oil to go back into the crank case (sump tank) and allow the cylinders and rings to seal properly.

I only have 5.4 hours on my SHO, and initial thoughts are that it's a BEAST!

Yes, all the 4.2 engines are plasma lined cylinders, done to decrease weight.  But that theory, in my mind, kind of falls apart when you think about where the "making oil" problem first became so infamous.......the bass fishermen and the 250 SHO's on their bass boats.  Obviously, bass fishermen don't do any trolling, and very little idling around, that I know of.  They usually get up, and run as fast as conditions allow from Point A to Point B, and shut down.   Then, they do it all over again.   All over and over again during a day of fishing.  But I do think it has something to do with breaking in the rings against the super slick plasma lines walls.   I am no mechanic, but as I understand it, the honing marks are only there for a short period during break in, and the sooner (especially during break in) and more that you build up heat and pressure in the engine, the sooner the rings will seat properly to provide a seal.  I followed Yamaha's break in procedure precisely, but wished I had followed the advice of a slew of people who advised me to run it like I stole it during the break in.    

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have personally fished with JEM , although I was not present during the break in period.....I can tell you all that his 22PF is incredibly fast from low range to WOT. I've had a F250 on a PF2400 and now have a F150 on a PF2200...and there is no comparison to JEM's boat with the 225SHO , it is very very very fast...and the throttle response upon accelerating is astounding. It also sounds like a small block Chevy V-8 engine with a roller cam and racing headers.

If you get a chance to go for a ride with him....take some goggles...those gnats, butterflies and horse flies hurt when you are running over 60 mph. ....JJ

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, JEM said:

Yes, all the 4.2 engines are plasma lined cylinders, done to decrease weight.  But that theory, in my mind, kind of falls apart when you think about where the "making oil" problem first became so infamous.......the bass fishermen and the 250 SHO's on their bass boats.  Obviously, bass fishermen don't do any trolling, and very little idling around, that I know of.  They usually get up, and run as fast as conditions allow from Point A to Point B, and shut down.   Then, they do it all over again.   All over and over again during a day of fishing.  But I do think it has something to do with breaking in the rings against the super slick plasma lines walls.   I am no mechanic, but as I understand it, the honing marks are only there for a short period during break in, and the sooner (especially during break in) and more that you build up heat and pressure in the engine, the sooner the rings will seat properly to provide a seal.  I followed Yamaha's break in procedure precisely, but wished I had followed the advice of a slew of people who advised me to run it like I stole it during the break in.    

I'm with you, i wish I would have run the dog out of it.  Mine makes oil and probably because the first 2 hours break in it was 35 degrees air and 38 water. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×