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lurem

Battling Humidty in Florida-Help

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Did some preventative maintenance on the outboard this weekend and trailer repairs.

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I noticed that when I took my engine cowl off that there was water condensation everywhere! The engine block seemed wet, the outside of the carbs wet and when I took the air cleaner housing off the carb throttle blades had water droplets on them!! My flywheel has a slight rust coating on it as well.

 I did notice the fiberglass under the poling platform and inside the center console was moldy as well.

My boat is stored under a carport so I am at the mercy of the Florida humidity. Any ideas on combating the humidity under the engine cowl and other areas?

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I put large tennis ball under the lids of my storage areas to hold them open and have two ventilation holes in my cover. You can get them from carver or west marine. The kit has a ventilation port and an adjustable pole. I also a have a fan on a timer that runs a set amount of time every other day. Seems like the humidity is worse here in No. Florida.

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Tennis balls would work for under the boat cover, Thanks!

Condensation was under my outboard engine cowl. I am thinking about rigging a small light bulb I can put under there and turn on when I am home and possibly leaving the hood cracked or maybe get one of those heating rods like for your gun safe. Other things I thought of are silica gel packs, one of those magnetic block heaters or just plain baking soda in a cup?

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I never tried it but I have thought about putting one of those small computer type fans near the air inlet to draw moisture out. Mine is parked in an open bay shed and gets damp under the cowl sometimes.  I have just been drying it and putting corrosion block on it.

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If you are thinking of going to the trouble of lifting the cowl for a light, have you considered just lifting the cowl and placing a on inch spacer under it. My first thought is a wooden dowel rod. I guess the draw back would be dust and insect activity. Something you would have to watch for. When I say insect I am thinking dirt dobber.

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I think ventilating the cowling is the only answer. The problem right now is that the metal in the engine cools off to somewhere around 75 degrees at night and it's insulated by the cowling. Then as the ambient temperature and humidity rises during the day, the humidity attaches to the colder engine metal, similar to the way humidity is attracted to a cold beer bottle. You could raise the cowing in some method, then have a bug screen made with a draw string. That would keep the engine metal at the same temperature as the ambient temperature and would not attract moisture or humidity and at the same time the bug screen would keep unwanted critters off the engine. Just saying. 

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Dale, I'm thinking Wayne has a point on the insect issues, gotta keep them out! I just had to "router" out my pee hole because of dirt dobbers.....little buggars are a pain in the rear and will plug the tube and set off the high temperature alarm. !!! I like the small computer fan Idea inside the cowling, would keep the air moving back out the cowling. There's a a bunch to pick from just on eBay, here's a 12v that would keep air moving really cheap. 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Arcade-or-Computer-120mm-12v-Cooling-Fan-/230918998403?epid=1101570236&hash=item35c3d84983:g:IrYAAOSwgQ9Vkc76

 

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The problem is being under a carport. The shade is whats causing the condensation.

 The direct sunlight helps keep things dry. I also spray the engine down with corrosion X about once a month, makes a huge difference.

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Step 1 should be cleaning it and then coating with corrosion X. If you see rust forming after that it might be worth it to take additional action, but honestly I have always used corrosion x or a similar product on multiple engines in different climates and environments and it always kept them looking new. 

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Your problem is you don't get out enough!!!!!!!!!

How bout this. A small fan you could mount or strap to the opening where the air is drawn in on the back of the cowling. I would think if used a fan to draw air out of the cowling it would keep the moisture down. Also keep the motor sprayed with a good corrosion preventive. 

Right now with all this rain, I don't think there is anything you could do. 

https://www.acinfinity.com/axial-ac-fan-kits/axial-8038-muffin-115v-ac-cooling-fan-80mm-x-80mm-x-38mm/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIxcy1kJz71QIV20oNCh0bEAKREAQYByABEgLsGPD_BwE

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There is also the possibility that water intruded inside during your boating activity and has not dried out

I noticed the problem before and have always blow dried the engine with my air nozzle. but when I go back several days later the condensation is back. It could be the seals but air can still get in through the top of the rear housing like it is designed.

I went to a couple jet ski websites (can I say jet ski on here?) and they are heavy into cleaning the engine compartment area including the engine with vinegar (to get rid of the salt deposits) then coating with a corrosion blocker before putting them away.

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1 hour ago, lurem said:

 

 

There is also the possibility that water intruded inside during your boating activity and has not dried out

I noticed the problem before and have always blow dried the engine with my air nozzle. but when I go back several days later the condensation is back. It could be the seals but air can still get in through the top of the rear housing like it is designed.

I went to a couple jet ski websites (can I say jet ski on here?) and they are heavy into cleaning the engine compartment area including the engine with vinegar (to get rid of the salt deposits) then coating with a corrosion blocker before putting them away.

I think you're on the right track Dale.  Salt attracts moisture to the point where if you don't remove it, the engine surfaces will probably not dry out with high humidity in the air, even if the cowling is left open to breathe.  The vinegar solution sounds good.  I would rinse it off well afterward, since it is acidic.

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Me thinks a lesson in psychometric charts are in order.

Boat in shed.

No sun

Boat cools at night.

Boat surface cools below dew point at night and has not heated in the sun from the day as it is in shed.

The following morning when dew points reach saturation points of 75 plus degrees the surrounding surface's sweat.

Ventilation helps as it tends to increase the evaporation rates but is not going to be a cure all.

Boats in sheds are a great environment to grow mushrooms.

 

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40 minutes ago, Capt. Troy said:

Me thinks a lesson in psychometric charts are in order

Dang Troy, you can take a man out of the business but you can't take the business out of the man! I was thinking the same thing and was wondering if you were going to chime in. Of course a little overboard for this particular situation, I say ventilate, air flow! TT is also on point, you would be surprised what can leak under the hood while running and then drip while parked.

 

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Wow Dale I didn't know you had a 16 ft mushroom farm on the side of your house. Does this happen all the time if not maybe it could be a combination of the water problem ( poppet valve )  you just had with your motor and the 30 plus inches of rain we had in three days was not normal . Joe R

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If there is salt on any surface it will attract moisture. I keep my boat in a garage and if there is any salt residue on metal or fiberglass parts, moisture forms. Rinse everything off really well to start with.

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I get that I have a moisture problem since my boat is under the carport that is covered by a huge oak tree and no sun beats directly on it to dry it out everyday.  Just trying to figure out how to deal with it a little better (I have lived there 10 years in that house and always had the same problem)

16 FOOT MUSHROOM!! Reminds me of the song verse by Jim Stafford in Wildwood Weed....."Take a trip and never leave the farm" Whoo hoo!

 

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Lurem, I have never keep a boat outside , I wonder if a outboard motor cover would help or hurt the moisture problem ?  Are you thinking about changing the name of your boat to the MUSHROOM :x       Joe R

 

 

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When you are backing the boat into the carport, just go back about 20' more.  A boat in the living room is always a good conversation piece.:D 

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I do have an outboard motor cover and it seems to make it a lot worse.

Rick, for conversation pieces I have my KTM 450 EXC in the living room. Maybe I need a bigger living room!

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