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Dr. Pepper

moisture meter reading?

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So I just had my newly purchased 1992 Redfisher surveyed and the moister meter on a quarter of the boat from console to stern was wet. Very wet.  I dont know what to do now. Do i need to pop the cap and gut everything? Is it normal for a hull this old to have a reading like this? Im really so disappointed about these results.  I feel like i got ripped off for at least 4k. 

If anyone has any advice or guidance Id appreciate it.

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What exactly does the moisture meter testing include?  Atmosphere of the bilge?  Do they drill holes in the stringers and test?  Do they measure moisture inside the layers of fiberglass and/or gelcoat?  I would like to know more about this.  Thanks in advance.

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No its a device that looks like a stud finder with a needle to measure the moisture inside through the hull. As far as I know anyway. To me this would mean the foam is wet inside but im not exactly sure.

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I'm not expert, I'm not even a novice in this department, so take my input for what it worth. 

I don't know that I would worry to much about it. I would only have real concern if there was wood, and I would think the transom would the most worry. 

Maybe consider looking for holes or cracks. If you don't see anything maybe take the trim tabs off and see if any water comes out. If so let it dry out and and seal up all the holes really good. Maybe take the motor mount bolts out, give it few days to dry and then reseal. 

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Before getting crazy get the boat weighed ,that will tell you the real story.  You can ask here if the weight is out of line with the boats others have.  Do you know if the boat was kept in the water? If it was trailered I would doubt it could pick up that much water.

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On ‎5‎/‎6‎/‎2017 at 6:34 PM, Dr. Pepper said:

No its a device that looks like a stud finder with a needle to measure the moisture inside through the hull. As far as I know anyway. To me this would mean the foam is wet inside but im not exactly sure.

what you stated is correct. it is a reading of moisture that is in the hull. used a lot for blister repairs to see if the hull has dried out enough sitting on the hard to begin repairs. normally a survey is done as a pre-purchase inspection including this test  to find things like this out and other unseen problems not picked up by the buyer. you have the right to feel ripped off, you were. only suggestion, take it to a shop, have it inspected for damages, then repaired. more than likely will have to have small holes drilled into the worst parts to dry out at the very least. only a shop can tell what would have to be done and find the cause. sorry, could take a long time for the dry out. normally, age should not be a factor if maintained correctly. kept on trailer or in water does make a difference but not to the extent you or saying. not an expert but have been on way too many survey's and have this come up time and again. best of luck too you.

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I don't personally feel like it's a huge deal. I had a practically water logged Carolina Skiff J14. I drilled some holes in the stern (not transom but where the trim tabs would be). I did have a dry space in a warehouse where I propped it up. The water slowly drained out of the holes. It did take a while, I let it drain until it wasn't dripping anymore for a week before I sealed it and then started my project. Boat was great til the day I sold it.

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I think im going to take the cap off and restore this boat for several reasons. I can beef up the transom, rewire it more easily, and check the fuel tank out and replace. I want to remove the old foam and pour new foam. Thanks for the posts, and ill let everyone know once i get into it.

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I see this all the time in surveys that are required to bind insurance, especially for older yachts. Accredited boat & yacht surveyors use moisture meters to determine if wood, laminate, foam, etc are saturated. And, if so, to what extent. It's never a good thing if that type of meter picks up substantial moisture. I don't think that a 1992 RF has wood in it (?) but the foam and/or stringers could be what's holding the moisture. It's hard to determine without destructive testing. When in doubt, pop the cap and replace everything you see!

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